Dissemination and exploitation

Work package type:Dissermination and Exploitation

Reference number: 8

The objective of WP8 is to publicise the project progress, successes and outcomes as far as possible, raise awareness across the field of Higher Education about regional capacity building for enhanced MHEW via various, innovative avenues, and extend the impact of project results beyond the project duration.

WP8 is designed to engage the academic and support staff in the partner institutions in building their capacity to work regionally, and also strengthen links between HEIs and social and economic actors involved in MHEW. WP8 also intends to contribute to the implementation and shaping of national, regional and European policies and systems by communicating the project results and embedding them in the HEIs across the regions of programme and partner institutions.

The main language of dissemination exploitation will be English. However, several of the WP outputs will be translated into partner and programme country languages in order to expand access to target audiences in all the countries.

A draft project dissemination and exploitation plan has been developed to maximise the effect of the project activities on the immediate participants and wider audience during the project duration and also beyond its completion. This will be refined and approved by the CABARET steering committee by M6.

The dissemination and exploitation plan takes advantage of the proposals strong Associate Partners and will make use of existing events and meetings to maximise reach, such as events planned by the IOC/UNESCO (P18) Intergovernmental Coordination Group and its Working Group 1 - Tsunami Risk, Community Awareness and Preparedness & Working Group 2 - Tsunami Detection, Warning and Dissemination. Specific events will be identified during the project but this link is indicative of the opportunities available through this Group:http://www.ioc-tsunami.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=58&lang=en. Likewise, ADPC (P17) organises potential events across Asia (http://www.adpc.net/igo/contents/Training/training-schedule.asp?tname=Training%20Schedule#sthash.0Yz6S6n8.dpbs), while FSLGA (P16) is an affiliated body of the Commonwealth Local Government Forum (CLGF), the International City & County Managers Association (ICMA) and the United Cities and Local Government (UCLG), giving widespread dissemination forums. Beyond the Associate Partners, the programme and partner country HEI’s contacts will be utilised. For example, HUD (P1) are a key partner of the UNISDR Making Cities Resilient Campaign (MCR) and are members of its steering committee, while also being officially appointed to act as Advocates of UNISDR. As such, they are well placed to reach out to the MCR’s 3000 participating cities.

Similarly, several national partners have been identified and agreed to support the dissemination and exploitation of the project: Local Government Authority (Maldives); Philippines Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) -

Dr Renato Sodium http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph (Philippines); Earthquake and Tsunami Center – Bureau for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) and Earthquake and Tsunami Center – Bureau for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), and National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) (Indonesia).

Full details of each partner’s links to potential dissemination channels are given in Part D.

The plan will also ensure the sustainability of the project and its outcomes after the completion of the funding period. The EU programme country HEIs will use their extensive experience of identifying and targeting beneficiaries to ensure the dissemination activities are effective. They will also ensure effective dissemination outside Asia, both in the EU and globally.

Further information on the dissemination and exploitation strategy is given in G2 – detailed description of the project.

Tasks:

8.1 Develop dissemination and exploitation plan: identifies target groups and mechanisms to reach them.

8.2 Develop promotional kit:  project logo, presentation template, flyer, poster, and website for use in partner and programme countries participating in the project.

8.3 Develop sustainability plan: will identify the need and means by which activities and results can be extended beyond the initial 36 month workplan. The regional innovation hub (WP4) and online capacity building platform (WP7) are foreseen as key infrastructure for achieving this.

8.4 Host policy dialog with key stakeholders: Policy briefing(s) will be written and dialog event(s) held to target the roadmap (WP5) findings and actions towards regional actors, senior level government, higher education and social and economic representatives with the current status and ways to increase regional cooperation for MHEW, and thereby promote the long term buy in of the CABARET outputs/outcomes. The brief(s) will be written and dialog(s) organised in close collaboration with the Associate Partners most closely linked to the target actors, such as ADPC (P17) to regional actors in disaster risk reduction, IOC-UNESCO (P18) to Member States involved in the Indian Ocean MHEW, and FSLGA (P16) to local government.    

8.5 Write papers and deliver presentations about the CABARET project and results: A series of papers will be written that capture key learning issues around regional capacity building for MHEW, drawing upon the capacity gap analysis & capacity development framework (WP1), as well as innovation hub (WP4) and roadmap (WP5). The papers will be authored by multi-partner teams representing the EU and Asian partners, and will target relevant conferences and journals. Partners will be encouraged to deliver presentations about the CABARET project and results to a range of academic and non-academic audiences, locally, nationally, regionally and internationally.

9.6 Produce CABARET report: A project report will be prepared to disseminate and exploit the results of the project to a wider community. The report will include the aim and objectives of the project; the research methodology; the importance of regional capacity building for enhanced MHEW. The report will be used as a dissemination material to embed capacity building processes and project results within the HEIs. This report will be disseminated publicly.
 

Learning and teaching tools, methodologies and approaches

Work package type: Development

Reference number: 7

WP7 will develop online regional infrastructure to sustainable capacity development within the partner HEIs, and across related social and economic actors involved in the MHEW process.

The United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (E/ESCAP/CDR(4)/2), which stresses the importance of a regional approach, also emphasises that progress in MHEW is uneven across the Asian region, with some high-risk, low-capacity countries falling behind.

In a similar vein, A 2015 Draft Policy Document and Strategic Plan prepared by members of the Tsunami Risk Assessment and Mitigation Task Team of the TRATE Project of the ICG/IOTWS identifies the need to establish a sustainable mechanism for training in coastal hazards and risk assessment and management for continuing professional development. The strategy recongises the considerable demand amongst Member States around the Indian Ocean to have structured training that will enhance the foundation of procedural knowledge and promote its take-up on a sustained and sustainable basis. WP7 will contribute to the overarching goal of this initiative: to establish a regional self-perpetuating fund of knowledge and experience in tsunami risk assessment and preparedness that will promote the implementation of these activities by Member States within a multi-hazard context and a framework of Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM). Such infrastructure would serve as a regional training resource for continuing professional development, and strengthen the link between higher education and social and economic actors.

WP7 will develop and manage a regional capacity development platform. While a significant amount of training and capacity development will take place in face to face sessions, this virtual platform will provide synchronous and asynchronous tools to support capacity development. In particular, this platform will host pre-session information about each of the planned training sessions, will provide digital archival facilities for learning material, facilitate related webinars and provide a digital space for target audiences to share ideas collaboratively and the opportunities to network in the virtual world. The platform will incorporate an online discussion forum and a training material repository.  

In addition to the highlighted supportive functions of this platform for this project, the infrastructure will also host Major Online Open Courses (MOOCs) for training within the MHEW area. MOOCs are becoming increasingly popular as a mode of delivering targeted courses and training sessions for specific subject areas. These will be open to anyone, delivered online (largely pre-complied) major courses which provide intended training within a specified subject domain. It is envisaged partner HEIs, and other HEIs within this region, could utilise this repository within their own teaching and learning, and capacity building programmes.  The structure and the nature of MOOCs will be determined through the capacity development framework (WP1) and roadmap (WP5).

The respository would be further promoted through The Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) of Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System (IOTWS). Key members of this group, Professor Samantha Hettierachi (Vice Chair) and Dr Harkunti Rahayu (Chair of Working Group 2), are the lead representatives for Partners P7 and P9, so we are well placed to facilitate this promotion.

The involvement of EU programme country partners will add value due to their extensive experience of developing online infrastructures within their own institutions as well as for EU funded research programmes.  

Tasks:

4.1 Develop functional and technical specification for the regional capacity building platform: using the WP1 capacity development framework as a starting point (this will capture high level functional requirements and current ICT capacities), this task will specify the functional and operational requirements of the partnership with regards to the capacity building platform. The very notion of a bespoke training environment is based on custom tools and resources required for specialised training; hence the need for requirements capture (within the WP1 capacity development framework). While there are off the shelf products enabling the creation of a quick online platforms for learning, teaching and training needs, the intention of the CABARET infrastructure is to provide custom support for the partners for specialised training.

4.2 Development and the implementation of the regional capacity building platform: Based on the developed functional and technical specifications, the platform will be developed, predominantly using open source technologies and intended to be presented as a web application. The development lifecycle will have 3 milestones: the prototype, first alpha release for internal testing; first beta release for public (partner) testing; and, the final product. The prototype and the alpha testing will be open to the P1 team and the first beta release will be released to all partners for final comments before finalising the product. User surveys in accordance with the quality plan (WP3) will be used to capture feedback and refine the platform.

4.3 Develop manual for technical staff and users: During the first beta release, draft technical manuals and user instructions will be prepared to ensure that the platform is easy to maintain and use. User surveys in accordance with the quality plan (WP3) will be used to capture feedback and refine the manual.

4.4 Design, develop and host appropriate MOOCs within the platform: A significant resource within the virtual training environment will be the Major Online Open Courses. After making the platform available to all the partners, each of the planned training sessions will have “taster” courses as a MOOC within the virtual environment. These MOOCs consist of videos, training material and discussion forums to facilitate and represent the face to face training sessions. These MOOCs are intended to be open to the public extending the reach and the impact of the planned training activities.

Regional cooperation for MHEW

Work package type: Development

Reference number: 5

The objective of WP5 is to develop capacity to increase international cooperation by partner HEIs to tackle ways to enhance MHEW, with a focus on strengthening of regional relationships between HE and the wider economic and social environment. WP5 will develop a roadmap towards addressing regional gaps and priorities in Asia (informing actions at the regional level), as well as raise awareness of the importance of, and means by which, regional cooperation can take place (building capacity at the institutional level). WP5 will also consider the opportunities for inter-regional collaboration, for example, linking to North-Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, the Pacific, and Caribbean Sea.

This action directly addresses some of the challenges set out by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (E/ESCAP/CDR(4)/2), which stresses the importance of a regional approach. Progress in MHEW is uneven across the Asian region, with some high-risk, low-capacity countries falling behind. There is also uneven progress by hazard type and sub region. While significant progress has been achieved in strengthening MHEW for tsunami and tropical cyclones, important gaps exist for other hazards even though the necessary technology is increasingly more available.

Consequently, many countries in the Asian region are calling for regional MHEW systems as an effective means of addressing many of the gaps identified above, in particular in sharing scientific knowledge and applications, building capacity, sharing costs, and addressing transboundary disasters.

Tasks:

5.1 Develop a capacity building roadmap to address regional gaps and priorities: The roadmap will be developed at a series of workshops held among partner HEIs and wider social and economic actors, drawing upon the expertise of the Associate Partners. The roadmap will also draw extensively upon activities and deliverables of other WPs. The country and regional position papers (WP1) will help to set out the key regional gaps and priorities, while the innovation hub (WP4) will facilitate knowledge sharing and set out some of the mechanisms by which regional cooperation for MHEW can be increased. The roadmap will be widely disseminated through a policy brief and policy dialog (WP8), while training programmes for regional cooperation (WP5) and partnerships with social and economic actors (WP6) will help to raise awareness and understanding.

5.2 Develop regional cooperation training programme: The design of the regional cooperation training programme will be informed by the capacity development framework produced in WP1, thereby ensuring that the programme directly addresses national and regional priorities. The programme will be developed by experienced researchers and managers from programme country institutions, but in close consultation with the partner countries institutions. Although it is expected that the development of training materials will be led by researchers and managers at programme country (EU) institutions, experienced researchers and managers from the partner countries will be encouraged to contribute and contextualise the materials. Case studies will be used to illustrates practical examples of international cooperation and to highlight the potential benefits.

5.3 Deliver international cooperation training workshops: A series of face-to-face training workshops will be held in Asia and the UK. The precise content will be developed based on the capacity development framework (WP1) but it is anticipated that the programme raise awareness of why intra and inter regional cooperation is important (sharing scientific knowledge and applications, building capacity, sharing costs, and addressing transboundary disasters) but also develop the skills to make it happen, such as: Initiate and maintain collaborations with organisations abroad; Communicating and cooperating effectively with people from other cultures; Management and consultation for international cooperation; Leadership development; Developing international project proposals and managing international projects; Skills associated with organisation of international events, conferences and seminars; Basics of international exchanges; Negotiating agreements with partners; Networking.

All materials will be archived as MOOCs (Major Online Open Courses) within the CABARET online capacity building forum (WP7).

A regional MHEW system is an example of a public good for the region. The use of such a system by one country does not prevent other countries from using the same system and benefitting from it in a similar way. On the contrary, greater participation in regional warning systems tends to lower the cost, strengthen the sustainability and thus enhance the value for all members, as a single country would normally not be able to implement such a complex system without the cooperation of other countries and relevant regional and international organizations. Through improved regional cooperative mechanisms on MHEW, countries will be better able to share good practices, expertise and capacities in assessing risks, developing sustainable monitoring and warning services, creating proper dissemination and communication systems, and coordinating with communities to increase response capabilities. Higher Education, as a key actor in developing capacity and developing scientific knowledge, has an important role in improving this type of regional cooperation.

In identifying the need to increase regional cooperation, in the Erasmus+ “Regional Priorities for Joint and Structural Projects” for Erasmus+ KA2 Capacity Building in Higher Education identifies “international cooperation at regional level or cross regional level” as a regional priority in strengthening of relations between higher education and wider economic and social development (Category D).

From an EU perspective, cooperation with non-EU countries enhances the quality of education and training in the EU and beyond by promoting peer-to-peer learning and comparison with education systems worldwide. It offers opportunities for staff and students to broaden their horizons through participation in EU programmes. CABARET EU universities have a positive record of internationalisation; they have facilitated the development of international curricula and joint degrees, fostered international innovation projects, and supported the exchange of students, staff, and knowledge. They will use this experience to bring EU added value to the activity.

Partnerships with social and economic actors

Work package typ: Development

Reference number: 6

The objective of WP6 is to develop the capacity of partner HEIs to explore, promote and initiate opportunities for fruitful partnerships with social and economic actors to enhance MHEW and ensure wider social and economic benefits.

As stressed by Basher (2006), to be effective, MHEW systems for natural hazards need to have not only a sound scientific and technical basis, but also a strong focus on the people exposed to risk, and with a systems approach that incorporates all of the relevant factors in that risk, whether arising from the natural hazards or social vulnerabilities, and from short-term or long-term processes.

The shortcomings in preparation across Asia and elsewhere have been due to a lack of warning through poor regional detection and communication systems, but they also reflect inadequate awareness, planning and coordination.

Recent studies and practical experiences of hazards (e.g., Thomalla and Larsen, 2010) suggest that technological aspects of MHEW development have been receiving considerably more attention than human aspects such as hazard awareness, disaster preparedness, reconciling priorities in the context of multiple agendas. More attention needs to be paid to the cognitive and normative challenges in positioning MHEW systems and preparedness in the wider context of social change in the coastal societies and communities at risk. Better platforms for knowledge sharing are required to enable stakeholders to collectively negotiate these challenges, to improve the integration of MHEW with other priorities such as livelihoods improvement, natural resource management and community development, and to provide opportunities for critical reflection of 'on-the-ground' experiences. This can only be achieved through multi-stakeholder engagement, in particular, through improving the interface between scientists and wider social and economic actors.

The science and academic community has a critical role in providing specialised scientific and technical input to assist governments and communities in developing MHEW systems. Their expertise is central to analysing natural hazard risks facing communities, supporting the design of scientific and systematic monitoring and warning services, supporting data exchange, translating scientific or technical information into comprehensible messages, and to the dissemination of understandable warnings to those at risk. Higher education also has a critical role in developing human capacity through education.

The definition of social and economic actors can be broad in this context and this will be refined through the partnership development strategy. However, key actors will include those responsible for effective governance and institutional arrangements, the involvement of local communities, as well as gender perspectives and cultural diversity. In developing MHEW systems it is essential to recognize that different groups have different vulnerabilities according to culture, gender or other characteristics that influence their capacity to effectively prepare for, prevent and respond to disasters. Women and men often play different roles in society and have different access to information in disaster situations. In addition, the elderly, disabled and socio-economically disadvantaged are often more vulnerable. These actors are likely to include: communities and their representatives; local government; national government; regional institutions; international bodies; non governmental instititions; the private sector.

This need for greater partnership has been further stressed within The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, signed by 187 member states in 2015, and that will chart the global course over the next 15 years. MHEW is one of three global targets within the framework. The concept of ‘Words Into Action’ is strongly embedded within the Framework. During the consultations and negotiations that led to its finalisation, strong calls were made to develop practical guidance to support implementation, ensure engagement and ownership of action by all stakeholders, and strengthen accountability in disaster risk reduction. Partnerships between higher education and social and economic actors can help to ensure high impact, relevant outcomes from science and education.

Through the secondment strategy, WP6 will attempt to tackle the following issues: How can universities work better with social and economic actors to meet the needs of high-level, skills and competence building towards MHEW, and contribute to ‘words into action’? What forms of skills and workforce development are possible through the mobility of talents between university and non-academic sector? What funding and institutional mechanisms are needed to achieve circulation of knowledge and formation of competence and skills through the mobility of talents between academic and non-academic sectors? How do scientists learn through such mobility experiences, and how would that be embedded within social and economic actors?

As a starting point, the CABARET project will seek secondment opportunities for the academics in the MHEW research areas, so that it will act as a conduit to facilitate further social and economic actors / university collaborations. This secondment strategy will be developed through the outcomes of training workshops where both practice based experts, trainees and senior academics are present. These partnerships will help ensuring future sustainability of improved capacities of partner institutions through log term collaborations and funded research.

The CABARET consortia includes several associated partners (IOC/UNESCO, ADPC, FSLGA) from the non-academic sectors who will contribute to the design and delivery of training, sharing their views on university - academic links, and providing some staff with secondment opportunities.

For example, the Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre, based in Thailand, has been working for nearly 30 years in contributing to make Asia-Pacific safer by strengthening disaster resilience at all levels. ADPC is as an independent non-governmental organization. It works in a number of countries in the Asia region including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Saudi-Arabia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. With headquarters located in Bangkok, Thailand, ADPC has country offices in Bangladesh, Lao PDR and Myanmar. ADPC's well-established networks with government line agencies and strong partnerships with regional organizations and development agencies provide the foundation for their work. ADPC will be able to offer wide-ranging secondment opportunities for partners and also has extensive experience of working with higher education. They will also provide input towards training events linking with WPs in sharing their experiences in collaborating with academic and research, and putting together policy alongside with HEIs.

Similarly, the Federation of Sri Lankan Local Government Authorities (FSLGA) is the umbrella organisation for local government associations in Sri Lanka and its objectives include: To co-ordinate a unified approach among Local Government Authorities in Sri Lanka to resolve common issues and develop participatory governance for the well being of citizen; To increase the voices and effective participation of councillors in Local Government planning, development and decision making within the framework of participatory democracy and an associative spirit; and to strengthen the functioning and capacity of Local Government Authorities, and facilitate co-operation among all tiers for effective service delivery and development at all levels. FSLGA will contribute experience of the interface between government, the private sector and higher education, recognising their key roles in improving MHEW.

Tasks:

6.1 Prepare a university – social and economic actor strategy and implement a secondment plan for partner institutions: The strategy and secondment plan will be informed by the capacity development framework produced in WP1, thereby ensuring that the programme directly addresses national and regional priorities. To implement this task, the workshops organised as a part of the training sessions are expected to be used as a springboard. Within the training workshops, discussions are facilitated to gather secondment opportunities from various Associate Partners, and the buy-ins from the academic partners. Finalised secondment arrangements are not the expected outcome of this facilitation, rather it is about initiating and generating the interests of all the parties, by making them aware of mutual benefits. At the same time, a separated discussion forum will be created to facilitate further development of these facilities and a report will be produced documenting the identified “actors” and potential scope of opportunities for secondments. The secondment plan will document staff selection procedures, and methods for monitoring and reporting of secondments in accordance with the quality plan (WP3).

6.2 Deliver social and economic partnership training workshops: A series of face-to-face training workshops will be held. The precise content will be developed based on the capacity development framework (WP1) and partnerships strategy. However, it is anticipated that the following broad topics will be covered: Pathways to impact; Public engagement; Philosophy of secondments – inter and intra settings; Public, private or third sector insights; Cluster building management; Cross sector project development. In addition, It will develop partners’ skills to create practical toolkits and guides that contribute to developing regional and national strategies for multi-hazard early warning. It will also focus on promoting communication efforts towards improving the perception of stakeholders and governments on the benefits of MHEW, on securing stakeholder and government commitment to the United Nations Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30.

All materials will be archived as MOOCs (Major Online Open Courses) within the CABARET online capacity building forum (WP7). The Associated Partners, representing a range of non-academic institutions, will contribute to the design and delivery of these workshops.

6.3 Facilitate social and economic actor secondments: Selected staff from partners will benefit from meaningful exposure to the non-academic sector with different cultures consisting of a range of stakeholders/actors involved in MHEW, including: communities and their representatives; local government; national government; regional institutions; international bodies; non governmental instititions; the private sector. Selection procedures including key dates, who can apply, how to apply, what information needs to be submitted along with the application, assessment procedures will be established which are open, efficient, transparent, supportive and internationally comparable, as well as tailored to the type of opportunities available. 

Quality assurance and monitoring

Work package type: Quality Plan

Reference number: 3

The objective of WP3 is to ensure systematic monitoring and evaluation of the project’s activities to maximize the probability that the project will deliver its planned outputs and achieve its intended outcomes.

In order to achieve this, a comprehensive quality plan will be developed to establish standards, define objectively verifiable indicators, and describe the means of verification, including internal and external ‘customer’ evaluations. WP3 will be overseen by members of the Steering Committee (WP2), but will be further supported by external and independent representatives.

Internal evaluation will be informed by partners’ verbal and written evaluations of the project’s events, activities and outputs. External evaluation will be informed by the written annual reports of an Independent Evaluator from the field who will consider all WP. This external evaluator will receive all project plans and outputs. Reports in years 1 and 2 of the project will be used to identify and rectify any shortcomings in the performance of the project, while year 3 reports will be included in the project final report (WP2). Attendees of project events and activities, both internal and (if any) external to the project, will be asked to complete participant surveys.  The project’s quality plan will develop standard reporting templates for individual WPs. WP Leaders will be required to submit reports to the Project Coordinator on a quarterly basis (from month 6), reporting against indicators, as well as providing records of input/expenditure attributable to the project in line with EU financial guidelines. 

A progress survey (following on from the baseline survey conducted in WP1) and focusing on the same research and innovative capacities index and indices will be undertaken in the latter stages of the project to provide the project and its partners with an indicator of overall progress against the project objectives / outcomes.

The involvement of EU programme country partners will add value due to their extensive experience of research quality management. The involvement of all EU and Asia HEIs in quality management will help to fertilize knowledge transfer in effective quality practices.

Tasks:

3.1 Convene quality board: A quality board will be established and meet to ensure systematic monitoring and evaluation of the project’s activities to maximize the probability that the project will deliver its planned outputs and achieve its intended outcomes. The quality board will be a subcommittee of the steering committee and comprise members of the project steering committee, but further supported by representatives of the Associate Partners, and external and independent representatives. The quality board will be chaired by P6 and meet in accordance with the schedule of meetings for the steering committee. The first meeting will be used to refine and finalise the quality plan that has been drafted in the preparation of this proposal. Subsequent meetings will review quarterly WP reports against the quality plan, and also consider the results of internal and external evaluations.  

A draft quality plan has been prepared to ensure systematic monitoring and evaluation of the project activities, and thereby to maximize the probability that the project will deliver its planned outputs and achieve its intended outcomes. The quality plan will be coordinated jointly by P2 and P15 (WP3 leaders) and document agreed standards, objectively verifiable indicators, and methods of verification. These will form the basis from which WP Leaders will be required to report progress in quarterly reports, and will identify standard reporting templates for individual WPs. The plan also sets out means for internal and external ‘customer’ evaluations. The plan establishes standards, objectively verifiable indicators, and describe the means of verification, including internal and external ‘customer’ evaluations. This activity will be overseen by members of the project steering committee, but further supported by the Associate Partners, and other external and independent stakeholders. The project’s quality plan includes standard reporting templates for individual WPs. WP Leaders will be required to submit reports to the lead partner (P1) on a quarterly basis, reporting against indicators, as well as providing records of expenditure attributable to the project in line with EU financial guidelines.

3.2 Conduct capacity building progress survey against year 1 baseline: A progress survey (following on from the baseline survey conducted in WP1) and focusing on the same research and innovative capacities index and indices will be undertaken in the mid and latter stages of the project to provide the project and its partners with an indicator of overall progress against the project objectives / outcomes. This survey corresponds with the project logical framework. The results of the survey will be reported in the project report and research papers (WP9).